Welcome to my new website. It will be both fun and informative. It will have five of my favorite topics: pictures, thoughts, recipes, gardening ideas and did you know? Please enjoy, leave comments, ask questions and visit often.
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  • GARDENING THOUGHTS TO THINK ABOUT

    Posted on February 28th, 2011 Pam No comments

    It is always exciting to open the door and go out into the garden for the first time on any day.
    –Marion Cran

    Gardening is medicine that does not need a prescription–And with no limit on dosage.
    –Author unknown

    Weather means more when you have a garden. There’s nothing like listening to a shower and thinking how it is soaking in around your green beans. ~Marcelene Cox

    I love a good rain, it gets all the high spots in my garden.
    –Guila Olsen

  • NOTICE MOTHER NATURE’S PLANTING CLUES

    Posted on February 26th, 2011 Pam No comments

    Use Mother Nature’s clues to determine when you plant. Our seasons are changing, they aren’t what they once were. I plant about two to three weeks later now than I did five years ago.
    I came across these planting guides, they seemed to make sense to me, check them out.

    1. When Daffodils have bloomed your garden is ready for it’s hardy seeds like peas, carrots, onions, radishes and lettuce.
    2. When Lialoc blooms begin to open, plant hardy seedlings.
    3. When wisteria and spirea bloom, sew warm weather seeds, that need warm weather to germinate, like Nasturtium, Zinna, Sunflower and 4-o’ocks.

    Note: Last year, I planted Zinna’s, Sunflowers and 4-o’clocks, I must have planted them too early, because not very many of them came up. I know now that they don’t like cold, damp ground. I will pay more attention this year. The thing is, seeds will not germinate until Mother Nature tells them to, and if they are planted too soon, they will lay in the cold cold ground and eventually rot.

  • THOUGHTS, I’VE BEEN THINKING

    Posted on February 25th, 2011 Pam No comments

    The big advantage of a book is it’s very easy to rewind. Close it and you’re back at the beginning.
    –Jerry Seinfield

    How sad would be November if we had no knowledge of the spring!
    –Edwin Way Teale

    Using your imagination is the one time in life you can really go anywhere.
    –Ann Patchett

    Should you shield the canyons from the windstorms, you would never see the beauty of thier carvings.
    –Elisabeth Kubler-Ross

    Resentment is like taking poison and waiting for the other person to die.
    –Malachy Mccourt

  • TOMATO CAGES AREN’T JUST FOR TOMATOES

    Posted on February 24th, 2011 Pam No comments

    Tomato cages are great for holding tomatoes off the ground. They keep the tomato plant upright so it gets more sun and makes harvesting easier.
    But tomato cages aren’t just for tomatoes. I have several uses for them here they are:
    1. Tomatoes, of course.
    2. Peppers, some peppers like serano & cayenne branches break easily, cages help protect them from wind damage.
    3. Beans, helps with the drying process.
    4. Peas, yields will go up and cages encourage the vines to continue grow.
    5. Peonies, helps suport the heavy blossoms.
    6. Lilies, helps protect the delicate new growth.
    7. Any plant you want to protect from winter weather, hoses, footsteps and hoes.
    8. Marks any plant or seed that is still under-ground.
    9. Supports any plant that needs a little extra protection.

    Here is a picture of some Ancho Peppers with cages around them. There are two pepper plants inside of an old tire. I've found that tires help keep the temperature warmer and more constant.

    Some people may think having tomato cages everywhere just isn’t that attractive. But as the plants begin to grow, the cages is almost completely covered. So, if you can deal with a month of wire exposure, it soon all but disapears. I think the advantages are well worth it. Note: some plants are so heavy with fruit, the cages may need to be staked.

  • HERBS, Herb

    Posted on February 23rd, 2011 Pam No comments

    So I don’t know much about Herbs, but I will learn more this year when I plant about 15 different varieties.
    Here is a picture of eight Herb packages I recently purchased. If you will notice, I have three types of Basil. Lemon basil, Ruffle basil and even Cinnamon basil.

    Sweet basil has a strong clove scent if used when it is fresh.
    Red or purple ruffle basil has an anise flavor.
    I definitely want to try Cilantro or (Coriander).
    Sometime I would like to try licorice basil, it sounds interesting.

    There are two main reasons to grow Herbs. One reason is they are fresh for your recipes, making everything taste better. The other reason is, herbs are expensive, home grown herbs can save big.

    Most basil is an annual, although you can try to move the plant inside for the winter, it usually doesn’t survive. So harvest it at the end of the season. Some herbs can be dried and stored for up to a year. Some are allowed to go to seed and the seed is either used whole, or ground.

    To use most herbs fresh, just pick the top 2/3 of the stem and either bundle it together to use in soups or stews (note: this bundle is usually removed later.) Or strip off the leaves and chop them to use in all types of recipes. Sometimes it is best to keep the herbs out of the recipe during most of the cooking. If they are added at the last minute, their flavor is stronger.

    Please give me some insight into this wonderful world of Herbs.

    Below is a list of Herbs I found from several sources on the Internet. Of course, most of them I am not familiar with, but I do recognize a few.

    Angelica
    Anise
    Anise hyssop
    Artemisia
    Basil, Cinnamon
    Basil, Dark Purple
    Basil, Fine Verde
    Basil, Lemon
    Basil, Lettuce Leaf
    Basil, Licorice
    Basil, Lime
    Basil, Sweet
    Bay Plant
    Bee balm
    Borage
    Burnet
    Calendula (Pot Marigold)
    Caraway
    Catnip
    Chamomile, Chamaemelum nobile
    Chamomile, sweet false
    Chervil
    Chia
    Chives, common
    Cilantro (Coriander)
    Clary sage
    Comfrey
    Coriander (cilantro)
    Costmary, Chrysanthemum

    Cumin
    Dill Elephant
    Dill, Bouquet
    Elderberry
    Fennel
    Feverfew
    Geranium, Scented
    Germander
    Horehound
    Horseradish
    Hyssop
    Lavender
    Lemon balm
    Lemon verbena
    Lemongrass
    Lovage
    Marjoram
    Marsh Mallow
    Milk Thistle
    Mugwort
    Nasturtium
    Oregano
    Parsley
    Parsley, Curled
    Peppermint
    Perilla
    Purslane
    Rocket
    Rosemary
    Rue
    Saffron
    Sage
    Sage, Broadleaf
    Sage, Pineapple
    Salad Burnett

    Santolina
    Sea Parsley
    Soapwort
    Sorrel
    Southernwood
    Spearmint
    Stevia
    Summer savory
    Sunset Flower, Milkweed
    Sweet marjoram
    Sweet rocket
    Sweet woodruff
    Tansy
    Tarragon
    Thyme
    Valerian
    White Horehound
    Winter savory
    Wormwood
    Yarrow

  • CHOOSE YOUR FLOWER

    Posted on February 22nd, 2011 Pam No comments

    I took a few pictures of the tulips I ‘forced’ to bloom early in my house.
    I used an attachment on my flash to help the light seem more natural.
    Let me know which you like the best.

  • SEED INVENTORY

    Posted on February 19th, 2011 Pam No comments

    Real live gardening will be starting soon. If this hasn’t been done, now is a good time to check all seeds and take an inventory. Some of the seeds may be too old to plant this year, so test them in a moist paper towel and place the towel in a zip-lock bag. Check them every few days to see if any of the seeds have germinated. If most of them germinate, great, if not, throw them away. Or increase the number of ‘older’ seeds planted. Try writing the percentage of germination on the package, this will help when planting.

    If you have lots of seed packets, an easy way to keep track of all seed types is to group them together and place the groups in their own clear zip-lock bag. I group them this way.
    1. Lettuce, spinach
    2. Watermelon, Cantalope
    3. Squash
    4. Radishes
    5. Broccoli, Cauliflower
    6. Tomatoes
    7. Herbs
    8. Pumpkins
    9. Cucumbers
    10. Peppers

    Here are a few of my seeds in their plastic bags.

    This really helps to find each group quickly, without going through all of your seeds when you are ready to plant from each group. Also, seeds don’t get overlooked when organized this way.