Welcome to my new website. It will be both fun and informative. It will have five of my favorite topics: pictures, thoughts, recipes, gardening ideas and did you know? Please enjoy, leave comments, ask questions and visit often.
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  • GARDENING WEEK 9, PLANT ONIONS & ARTICHOKES

    Posted on February 28th, 2013 Pam No comments

    Week nine already!!!!!!!

    So now is the time to plant onion seeds and artichoke seeds. Plant these inside with a grow light, in a cold frame or in a greenhouse.  Planting them now gives them about a 40 day head start.
    Yes, Artichokes can be grown in eastern Idaho! I have grown them successfully now for three years. The Artichokes aren’t large, they are about baseball size.  If harvested when they are smaller, they don’t have a ‘choke’ part.  But the best part about growing artichokes is that because they are fresh, they taste so good!
    Artichokes and onions grow slowly, but they will withstand some cold weather.  Planting the seeds now will make sure they will be tall enough to transplant later.
    Last November I tried planting onion seeds, onion sets and radishes in my garden. I’ll update this site as to how they are doing as they come up this spring.
    Planting onions sets vs planting onion seeds. Planting onion sets gives the onions a huge head start, but do not store through the winter as well as the onions that were grown from seeds.  It is best to plant both onion seeds and onion sets.  Harvest the onion sets through the summer and fall, don’t harvest any onions grown from seeds.  Only harvest them late fall, dry them out and store for winter use.
    To plant onion seeds in flats, I use eight, 4″x 4″ inserts in each flat. I usually plant 50-75 seeds in each 4″x 4″ pack. It is best to plant them in 3-4 small rows. This makes it easier to transplant later.
    To plant artichokes in flats, I use eight 4-packs for each flat, in 32 separate 2″ containers. I usually plant two seeds per container or 62 seeds per flat. Then thin to one plant per 2″ container when they are about two inches tall.
    I recommend Green Globe or Imperial Star Artichokes  and Yellow Sweet Spanish Onions.
    Good luck and let me know how the planting is going!!
    Jan. 4th Week 1 Order gardening catalogs
    Jan. 11th Week 2 Check out Books & Magazines from Library
    Jan. 18th Week 3 Family survey
    Jan. 25th Week 4 Garden Journal, study gardening books
    Feb. 1st Week 5 Seed inventory, test seeds
    Feb. 8th Week 6 Make a garden plan
    Feb. 15th Week 7 How much to plant
    Feb. 22nd Week 8 Buy seeds
    Mar. 1st Week 9 Plant onion seeds and artichokes
    Mar. 8th Week 10 Trim Raspberries and apply Caseron
    Mar. 15th Week 11 Plant broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage seeds
    Mar. 22nd Week 12 Plant flower seeds & herbs
    Mar. 29th Week 13 Plant onion sets, plant raspberry starts
    Apr. 5th Week 14 Plant tomato, pepper seeds

  • GARDENING WEEK 8, BUY SEEDS NOW

    Posted on February 22nd, 2013 Pam No comments
    Yes, now is the time to buy garden seeds. Why??
    1.  Because the best selections are in stores now.  Be aware that the most popular seeds sell out quickly.
    2.  It may take up to four weeks to receive seeds when ordering from a catalog.
    3.  Spring is coming and it will be time to plant before we know it, buy or order now.
    4.  It is best to have seeds on hand when you want to plant them.
    Below is a 11 week schedule, we are on week 8.
    Jan. 4th Week 1 Order gardening catalogs
    Jan. 11th Week 2 Check out Books & Magazines from Library
    Jan. 18th Week 3 Family survey
    Jan. 25th Week 4 Garden Journal, study gardening books
    Feb. 1st Week 5 Seed inventory, test seeds
    Feb. 8th Week 6 Make a garden plan
    Feb. 15th Week 7 How much to plant
    Feb. 22nd Week 8 Buy seeds
    Mar. 1st Week 9 Plant onion seeds and artichokes
    Mar. 8th Week 10 Trim Raspberries and apply Caseron
    Mar. 15th Week 11 Plant broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage seeds
    Mar. 22nd Week 12 Plant flower seeds & herbs
    Mar. 29th Week 13 Plant onion sets, plant raspberry starts

  • THOUGHTS FOR THE WEEK, Dreams

    Posted on February 21st, 2013 Pam No comments

    Dreams do come true, for those that work while they dream.

    –PS. I Love You

    Don’t be afraid to say, ‘I don’t know.’

    Don’t be afraid to say, ‘I made a mistake.’

    –Life’s Little Instruction Book

    Thought is free.

    –William Shakespeare

    Life has no remote, get up and change it yourself.

    –www.spin

    Gratitude turns what we have…into…enough.

    –www.spin

  • WEEKLY GARDEN PICTURES

    Posted on February 20th, 2013 Pam No comments

    This is my Wednesday garden update. I try to take pictures of my garden (inside or outside) every Wednesday. Here are the pictures for today.

    This is the last of the tulips I forced in water January 5th.

    This is a small Hyacinths that I forced in water February 4th. This is the first time I have had a pink one.

    This is the same Hyacinths, but this one shows the roots. Can you see the pennies in the bottom? They help keep the water fresh.

  • THOUGHTS TO THINK ABOUT

    Posted on February 16th, 2013 Pam No comments

    Sometimes we become so focused on the finish line, that we fail to find joy in the journey.

    Why fit in when you were born to stand out?

    –Dr. Seuss

    Today I will behave as if this is the day I will be remembered.

    –Dr. Seuss

    Whenever I learn something the hard way, I like to teach it the easy way.

    –Draysten Bailey,  (Idaho Senior)

  • GARDEN WEEK 7, MAKE A GARDEN PLAN

    Posted on February 15th, 2013 Pam No comments
    This is quite a task, making a garden plan.  All of the weeks leading up to this week have prepared you for this huge undertaking.

    Listed below are a few tips.

    1.  First, put the same type of plants together, such as vine crops, salad greens and tall crops.
    2.  Place plants together that have the same watering needs, such as hand watering, sprinkling or drip irrigation.
    3.  Plan for succession planting, this is planting from two to five crops in the same place. A good example of this is salad greens and radishes.
    4.  Plan areas for saving seeds, this is an area where the vegetables will not be harvested but allow the seeds to dry or ripen for seed harvest. It is a good idea to mark these areas clearly, so they will not be harvested prematurely.
    5.  Plan areas for a fall garden, this is an area that will have crops ripen in the fall.
    7.  Plan areas for a winter garden, this is an area that will have crops that will winter over. For example, onions, peas and garlic.

    I usually make my garden plan in pencil and take it with me when planting the garden.  As I plant, I make changes if necessary.

    Below is a 12 week schedule, we are on week 7.

    Jan. 4th Week 1 Order gardening catalogs
    Jan. 11th Week 2 Check out Books & Magazines from Library
    Jan. 18th Week 3 Family survey
    Jan. 25th Week 4 Garden Journal, study gardening books
    Feb. 1st Week 5 Seed inventory, test seeds
    Feb. 8th Week 6 How much to plant
    Feb. 15th Week 7 Make a garden plan
    Feb. 22nd Week 8 Buy seeds
    Mar. 1st Week 9 Plant onion seeds and artichokes
    Mar. 8th Week 10 Trim Raspberries and apply Caseron
    Mar. 15th Week 11 Plant broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage seeds
    Mar. 22nd Week 12 Plant flower seeds

  • GARDENING WEEK 6, HOW MUCH TO PLANT?

    Posted on February 8th, 2013 Pam No comments
    How much to plant depends on how much your family will eat, and your garden space.
    This is as simple or as complex as you want to make it.
    1. List what can be planted in your area.
    2. List what your family likes to eat, (check the family survey taken in week three).
    3. List any items that are on both lists.
    4. Plant these items, (plant more of the items that are on multiple lists).
    5. When the list is complete, put the items in order of  importance.
    Consider these five things.
    1. Will we really eat it?
    2  Will we plant several crops throughout the season? Remember to have extra seeds for additional crops.
    3. Do I really have room for it?
    4.Would I rather plant something else?
    5. Am I going to do any canning or store  items over the winter?
    Some seed packets list how much a package will plant. For example, a package of carrots may plant 50 feet, while a package of peas may only plant 20 feet.  Use package information as a guideline of how much to plant.
    Try this link #mce_temp_url# for an information vegetable table.
    This is a very good starting place, but remember, this is just one guide, adjust if necessary.
    Here is some information found there:
    1.  The number of seeds in an ounce and seeds in a gram
    2.  How many seeds it takes to plant 100 feet
    3.  The yield for 10 feet
    4.  How much to plant per person.
    5.  Row spacing.
    6.  Information about direct seeding or transplanting.
    Listed below are 11 weeks of my 50 weeks of gardening list.  If you find yourself behind, it is easy to catch up.  This is my schedule for Idaho Falls, adjust if necessary.

    Jan. 4th Week 1 Order gardening catalogs
    Jan. 11th Week 2 Check out Books & Magazines from Library
    Jan. 18th Week 3 Family survey
    Jan. 25th Week 4 Garden Journal, study gardening books
    Feb. 1st Week 5 Seed inventory, test seeds
    Feb. 8th Week 6 How much to plant
    Feb. 15th Week 7 Make a garden plan
    Feb. 22nd Week 8 Buy seeds
    Mar. 1st Week 9 Plant onion seeds and artichokes
    Mar. 8th Week 10 Trim Raspberries and apply Caseron
    Mar. 15th Week 11 Plant broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage seeds