Welcome to my new website. It will be both fun and informative. It will have five of my favorite topics: pictures, thoughts, recipes, gardening ideas and did you know? Please enjoy, leave comments, ask questions and visit often.
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  • TYPES OF GARLIC, HARDNECK SOFTNECK

    Posted on April 22nd, 2018 Pam No comments

     

    This is one clove from a very large Musik garlic.

     

    This is a Musik garlic

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    What is hardneck and softneck garlic.

    The neck of the garlic is where the stem comes out of the center of the bulb.  The hardneck has a hard stem and the softneck has a soft stem.
    1. Hardneck
        A hard neck garlic usually has fewer cloves and only one layer of cloves.  In my opinion, this is great for cooking, because the cloves are larger and easier to clean.  A hardneck will have a scape growing from the center. Typically scapes begin to apear in late May to early June.  It is best to trim the scapes when they are about 15″ long and use them in cooking.
    2. Softneck
       Softneck garlic can have up to 18 cloves per bulb.  The cloves will be smaller and usually there are two layers of cloves and a center clove.  They typically do not grow scapes, but may grow small baby garlic called bulbits on the stem. It is best to remove these and use them in cooking, these will be full of flavor so use sparingly.
    At ‘On The Sunnyside’ I sell these varieties in August:
    Inchelium  – Softneck, mild flavor with just a hint of hot. 10-20 cloves per bulb.
    Early Italian – Softneck, spicy. Easy to grow and stores well.  15-20 cloves.
    Korean Red – Hardneck, hot, very hot.  6-8 cloves, easy to peel.
    Spanish Roja – Hardneck, rich earthy flavor.  8-12 cloves,
    Musik –         Hardneck, hot and spicy. 4-6 very large cloves, excellent storage.
    Chesnok Red – Hardneck, known for great flavor, great for cooking or baking. 10-12 cloves.
    Just a note on how to store garlic.
    It is best to store at 55 to 60 degrees, in a dark place ,but not damp. Store in a paper bag. DO NOT STORE IN A REFRIGERATOR, it may sprout and lose flavor.

  • HYACINTHS IN WINTER

    Posted on January 26th, 2018 Pam No comments

    These Hyacinths are called Pink Pearl, one of my favorites.

     

    These are called Blue Star, three growing in a small bowl.

    Here are a collection of different hyacinths, so pretty.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    HYACINTHS (growing in water)

    Hyacinths are so fun to grow in the winter time. They give us a sneak peak of spring and they have the sweetest fragrance. When growing bulbs inside during winter and early spring it is called ‘forcing’. It is a process of making the bulbs bloom ahead of schedule.

    Here are a few ideas of how to care for Hyacinths growing in water.
    1. Rinse with clear water every week, carefully rub the roots to clean them and if necessary clean the bottom of the bulb.
    2. You may want to clean, replace, or add more pennies to the bottom of the vase, (the pennies help the water stay fresh).
    3. Putting the Hyacinth in the fridge will help it last longer or slow down the growing process. However, be careful not to freeze the flower.
    4. After the bloom is finished, trim the blossom stem and continue to water the bulb. This encourages the leaves to grow and the leaves give much needed energy back to the bulb. Hyacinth bulbs can then be planted in the garden in the spring, (with the leaves intact). It may take a year or two for it to recover enough to bloom again.

    Please feel free to call me with questions.

    ‘ON THE SUNNYSIDE’
    Pam Olsen
    3210 E. Sunnyside Rd.
    Idaho Falls, ID 83406

    208-406-1243
    pamolsen@prophoto.bz
    www.pamolsen.net

  • Quick Tip #5

    Posted on October 4th, 2015 Pam No comments

    ROTATING NIGHT SHADE VEGETABLES

    Potatoes, Tomatoes and Peppers are all members of the night shade family.

    When rotating a garden consider these three as one group, so it is best not to plant potatoes next year where tomatoes were planted this year and so on.  So rotate all of them to new areas.

    This is difficult if you have a small or large garden. But if you give it some thought you can develop a plan next year that will work for you. It is best to work on a three or four year rotation.

    Another quick tip about the night shades, it is best to remove all produce and vines from the garden.  Do not dig the vines under or compost them.  They may contain fungus or unhealthy spores that may linger in the soil or compost.

    NOTE:  it is best to make next year garden plans now because it is easy to remember where all vegetables were planted this past year.

  • Quick Tip #3

    Posted on September 14th, 2015 Pam No comments

    Time to give tomatoes a hair cut!!!!

    Trimming tomatoes this time of year helps the ripening process. With less vines to rob energy, more energy can go to the tomatoes and they will be larger and ripen quicker.

    Be careful with bush tomatoes, trimming to many vines will cause sunburn on the tomatoes themselves.   It is always safe to trim the lower branches and the vines that are unhealthy.

    NOTE:  trimming with scissors will leave the branches with a clean cut, they will heal faster and prevent disease and bug intruders.

    NOTE 2:  This also works on peppers.