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  • HERBS, Herb

    Posted on February 23rd, 2011 Pam No comments

    So I don’t know much about Herbs, but I will learn more this year when I plant about 15 different varieties.
    Here is a picture of eight Herb packages I recently purchased. If you will notice, I have three types of Basil. Lemon basil, Ruffle basil and even Cinnamon basil.

    Sweet basil has a strong clove scent if used when it is fresh.
    Red or purple ruffle basil has an anise flavor.
    I definitely want to try Cilantro or (Coriander).
    Sometime I would like to try licorice basil, it sounds interesting.

    There are two main reasons to grow Herbs. One reason is they are fresh for your recipes, making everything taste better. The other reason is, herbs are expensive, home grown herbs can save big.

    Most basil is an annual, although you can try to move the plant inside for the winter, it usually doesn’t survive. So harvest it at the end of the season. Some herbs can be dried and stored for up to a year. Some are allowed to go to seed and the seed is either used whole, or ground.

    To use most herbs fresh, just pick the top 2/3 of the stem and either bundle it together to use in soups or stews (note: this bundle is usually removed later.) Or strip off the leaves and chop them to use in all types of recipes. Sometimes it is best to keep the herbs out of the recipe during most of the cooking. If they are added at the last minute, their flavor is stronger.

    Please give me some insight into this wonderful world of Herbs.

    Below is a list of Herbs I found from several sources on the Internet. Of course, most of them I am not familiar with, but I do recognize a few.

    Angelica
    Anise
    Anise hyssop
    Artemisia
    Basil, Cinnamon
    Basil, Dark Purple
    Basil, Fine Verde
    Basil, Lemon
    Basil, Lettuce Leaf
    Basil, Licorice
    Basil, Lime
    Basil, Sweet
    Bay Plant
    Bee balm
    Borage
    Burnet
    Calendula (Pot Marigold)
    Caraway
    Catnip
    Chamomile, Chamaemelum nobile
    Chamomile, sweet false
    Chervil
    Chia
    Chives, common
    Cilantro (Coriander)
    Clary sage
    Comfrey
    Coriander (cilantro)
    Costmary, Chrysanthemum

    Cumin
    Dill Elephant
    Dill, Bouquet
    Elderberry
    Fennel
    Feverfew
    Geranium, Scented
    Germander
    Horehound
    Horseradish
    Hyssop
    Lavender
    Lemon balm
    Lemon verbena
    Lemongrass
    Lovage
    Marjoram
    Marsh Mallow
    Milk Thistle
    Mugwort
    Nasturtium
    Oregano
    Parsley
    Parsley, Curled
    Peppermint
    Perilla
    Purslane
    Rocket
    Rosemary
    Rue
    Saffron
    Sage
    Sage, Broadleaf
    Sage, Pineapple
    Salad Burnett

    Santolina
    Sea Parsley
    Soapwort
    Sorrel
    Southernwood
    Spearmint
    Stevia
    Summer savory
    Sunset Flower, Milkweed
    Sweet marjoram
    Sweet rocket
    Sweet woodruff
    Tansy
    Tarragon
    Thyme
    Valerian
    White Horehound
    Winter savory
    Wormwood
    Yarrow

  • WEEDS OR HERBS?

    Posted on February 2nd, 2011 Pam No comments

    “A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered.”
    –Ralph Waldo Emerson

    A weed is a plant that is growing where you don’t want it. Some weeds have medicinal purposes, or can be used to season recipes. Some attract benifical insects while others are used to repel pests.

    “Known variously as “pigweed”, “pitseed”, “goosefoot”, “huauzontle”, or “lambsquarters”, Chenopodium berlandieri is an annual herbaceous plant widely regarded as a weed. However, several varieties are grown for food, utilizing different characteristics of the plant…Varieties of pigweed are grown for the broccoli-like seed heads; other varieties are grown for grain; still others are grown because the leaves of the plant are much like spinach.”
    –bigmyrtle.blogspot.com

    “Tansy is not a culinary herb as it has a very bitter taste. It is best used as an insect repellent. Use dried tansy in bags and pomanders to repel moths in clothes cupboards. Plant around the dog’s kennel. A pot on the kitchen window sill will help repel flies and strewing the barbecue table with bunches of tansy leaves is a good idea. Add the leaves to the compost bin as they are rich in potassium. An infusion of the leaves can be used as spray to repel garden pests.”
    –Global-Garden.com

    Perslane – “The seeds of purslane or pigweed have recently been found to be an excellent source of ‘Omega 3’ fatty acids, and research is being done into how they may be utilised to improve our diet. They may be fed to pigs and poultry to improve the Omega 3 content of their meat and eggs. The leaves can also be used as a substitute for spinach, as a salad vegetable or included in cooked meat dishes. Traditionally, purslane was valued as a treatment for digestive disorders, as an anti-inflammatory and for respiratory problems.
    –Global-Garden.com